Storytelling.
I do not claim rights to any of these pictures. All my posts are re-blogged pictures from bloggers. These pictures inspire me: taking me to a place, a time, a feeling, a dream. Enjoy.
Storytelling.
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lifestyleoftheunemployed:

Stay in Shape While Traveling
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luckywelivecalifornia:

agirlnamedally:

philoxaly:

luckywelivecalifornia:

sydneytakesphotos:

black sand is better

i can’t believe the notes!!!!

Is this in Hawaii? Or an island with a volcano??

I think that’s Punalu’u on the Big Island :) I want to go here in this life please

no this is wainapanapa state beach on maui!
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outofreception:

Crater Lake
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hitrecord:

“let it all burn away”
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Contribute to the “RE: FIRE” collab HERE
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English majors want the joy of seeing the world through the eyes of people who—let us admit it—are more sensitive, more articulate, shrewder, sharper, more alive than they themselves are. The experience of merging minds and hearts with Proust or James or Austen makes you see that there is more to the world than you had ever imagined. You see that life is bigger, sweeter, more tragic and intense—more alive with meaning than you had thought.

Real reading is reincarnation. There is no other way to put it. It is being born again into a higher form of consciousness than we ourselves possess. When we walk the streets of Manhattan with Walt Whitman or contemplate our hopes for eternity with Emily Dickinson, we are reborn into more ample and generous minds. “Life piled on life / Were all too little,” says Tennyson’s “Ulysses,” and he is right. Given the ragged magnificence of the world, who would wish to live only once? The English major lives many times through the astounding transportive magic of words and the welcoming power of his receptive imagination. The economics major? In all probability he lives but once. If the English major has enough energy and openness of heart, he lives not once but hundreds of times. Not all books are worth being reincarnated into, to be sure—but those that are win Keats’s sweet phrase: “a joy forever.”

The economics major lives in facts and graphs and diagrams and projections. Fair enough. But the English major lives elsewhere. Remember the tale of that hoary patriarchal fish that David Foster Wallace made famous? The ancient swimmer swishes his slow bulk by a group of young carp suspended in the shallows. “How’s the water?” the ancient asks. The carp keep their poise, like figures in a child’s mobile, but say not a word. The old fish gone, one carp turns to another and says, “What the hell is water?”

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melisica:

(by GunnarJoggesko)
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